Bee-Control

Our 24 hour Bee Service includes wax, honey, and hive removal


Our 24 hour Bee Service includes wax, honey, and hive removal. Like our other services, we have 100% customer satisfaction!

Beehive

beehiveA beehive is an enclosed structure[citation needed] in which some honey bee species of the subgenus Apis live and raise their young. Natural beehives are naturally occurring structures occupied by honeybee colonies, such as hollowed-out trees, while domesticated honeybees live in man-made beehives, often in an apiary. These man-made structures are typically referred to as “beehives”. Several species of Apis live in hives, but only the western honey bee (Apis mellifera) and the eastern honey bee (Apis cerana) are domesticated by humans. A natural beehive is comparable to a bird’s nest built with a purpose to protect the dweller.


Honeybees

honeyThe honey bee (Apis mellifera) is the most important pollinator in North America and most of the world. As such, it is worthy of a special measure of respect: Honeybees are controlled by killing only when there’s no other reasonable alternative. Preferably, they should be removed by an experienced beekeeper. Honey bees have a fascinating system of communication that seems to use both pheromones and bodily movements to communicate ideas, such as the distance and direction to sources of food or threats to the hive. This is one of the things that makes them problematic: If they think you’re a threat, they’ll attack in great numbers — which is always extremely painful, and can be life-threatening to people who are allergic to bee stings.

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NEEDLES CA | 760.550.7948


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Beehive

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A beehive is an enclosed structure[citation needed] in which some honey bee species of the subgenus Apis live and raise their young. Natural beehives are naturally occurring structures occupied by honeybee colonies, such as hollowed-out trees, while domesticated honeybees live in man-made beehives, often in an apiary. These man-made structures are typically referred to as “beehives”. Several species of Apis live in hives, but only the western honey bee (Apis mellifera) and the eastern honey bee (Apis cerana) are domesticated by humans. A natural beehive is comparable to a bird’s nest built with a purpose to protect the dweller.

The beehive’s internal structure is a densely packed group of hexagonal cells made of beeswax, called a honeycomb. The bees use the cells to store food (honey and pollen) and to house the “brood” (eggs, larvae, and pupae).

Artificial beehives serve several purposes: production of honey, pollination of nearby crops, housing supply bees for apitherapy treatment, as safe havens for bees in an attempt to mitigate the effects of colony collapse disorder, and to keep bees as pets. Artificial hives are commonly transported so that bees can pollinate crops in other areas.[1] A number of patents have been issued for beehive designs.


Honeybees

honey beesThe honey bee (Apis mellifera) is the most important pollinator in North America and most of the world. As such, it is worthy of a special measure of respect: Honeybees are controlled by killing only when there’s no other reasonable alternative. Preferably, they should be removed by an experienced beekeeper.

Honey bees have a fascinating system of communication that seems to use both pheromones and bodily movements to communicate ideas, such as the distance and direction to sources of food or threats to the hive. This is one of the things that makes them problematic: If they think you’re a threat, they’ll attack in great numbers — which is always extremely painful, and can be life-threatening to people who are allergic to bee stings.

Another problem with honey bees is that they often build hives inside wall and ceiling voids in homes. The honey attracts other insects (and sometimes wildlife), and can stain or damage your home when it leaks. It’s usually necessary to locate and remove the hive after honeybees have been removed because it’s their flapping wings that act as an air-conditioning system. Once they’re gone, the honey melts quite quickly.

What it really comes down to is that if you have honey bees in some part of your property where they’re not bothering anyone, you really should consider leaving them alone. If they have to be controlled, live removal is the preferred method. Killing them should be considered a last resort.


Bumble Bees

bumbleBumblebees are large, social bees that usually nest in the ground. Unlike honey bees, bumblebee colonies are annual. Toward the end of the summer, reproductive bumblebees will leave the colony and mate, the mated queens will burrow into the ground to overwinter, and the colony they emerged from will die.

Like honey bees, bumblebees are important pollinators of both wild and agricultural plants. Their long tongues make them able to pollinate some plants that honey bees cannot. They also have a longer pollination season (they start pollinating earlier in the spring, and keep pollinating later in the fall), and pollinate on cloudy days.

The problem with bumblebees is that their nests are easy to stumble upon, and the bees are quite aggressive in defending it. Bumblebees station “guard bees” around the hole to watch for threats; and unlike honey bees, bumblebees can sting more than once, and the stings are very painful.

Because of their value as pollinators, we really hate to kill bumblebees. If they’re in some out-of-the-way place where they’re not bothering anyone, you may want to consider leaving them alone. They’re pretty mild-mannered as long as you stay away from their nests.


Carpenter Bees

Carpenter BeesCarpenter bees are large, solitary bees that look a lot like bumblebees, except that the carpenter bee’s abdomen is shiny black, and the bumblebees fuzzy yellow and black. Although technically “stinging insects,” they almost never sting. The males don’t even have stingers (although they like to act as if they do), and the females rarely sting unless you practically sit on them.

In addition to being quite passive as stinging insects go, carpenter bees are also efficient pollinators. They’re especially good pollinators of garden vegetables (especially nightshades like tomatoes, eggplant, and peppers) and most ornamental flowers.

In fact, if it weren’t their annoying habit of drilling holes, carpenter bees probably would be the most popular bees around. Unfortunately, drilling holes is a central part of being a carpenter bee. They drill perfectly round, one-half inch holes in wood, then they make a sharp turn and burrow along the grain. They make tunnels that can sometimes reach over a foot in length in which they lay their eggs and rear their young in the tunnels.

Over time, carpenter bees can do extensive damage to houses, playground equipment, wooden lawn furniture, and other wooden structures.

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